Remembering the ‘Rubble Women’

Die Anerkennung der 'Trümmerfrauen'
  • In the former East Germany, <em>Trümmerfrauen</em> were celebrated in works such as this life-sized bronze statue, which has the feel of revolutionary romanticism about it. It stands today before the Rotes Rathaus, Berlin's town hall.

    In the former East Germany, Trümmerfrauen were celebrated in works such as this life-sized bronze statue, which has the feel of revolutionary romanticism about it. It stands today before the Rotes Rathaus, Berlin's town hall.

  • The sculptor also produced a male equivalent; both were called 'Construction Helpers' (<em>Aufbauhelferin</em> and <em>Aufbauhelfer</em>). Socialist East Germany officially recognised gender equality more than the West.

    The sculptor also produced a male equivalent; both were called 'Construction Helpers' (Aufbauhelferin and Aufbauhelfer). Socialist East Germany officially recognised gender equality more than the West.

  • The former West Germany was slower to recognise the efforts of <em>Trümmerfrauen</em>, emphasising instead a return of these women to the status quo of wife and mother. But recognition did come, such as in this limestone memorial.

    The former West Germany was slower to recognise the efforts of Trümmerfrauen, emphasising instead a return of these women to the status quo of wife and mother. But recognition did come, such as in this limestone memorial.

  • Located in the Hasenheide Park, this 2.4m tall sculpture is depicted pensive and tired, a contrast to the East German heroism. It sits atop one of the many hills called <em>Schuttberge</em>, formed from debris that could not be reused.

    Located in the Hasenheide Park, this 2.4m tall sculpture is depicted pensive and tired, a contrast to the East German heroism. It sits atop one of the many hills called Schuttberge, formed from debris that could not be reused.

  • From about 400 million cubic metres of ruins all over Germany, <em>Trümmerfrauen</em> had to salvage, clean and transport by hand, re-usable construction material. Tools used included pick axes, hand-winches and wheel barrows.

    From about 400 million cubic metres of ruins all over Germany, Trümmerfrauen had to salvage, clean and transport by hand, re-usable construction material. Tools used included pick axes, hand-winches and wheel barrows.

Links:

Wikipedia – Trümmerfrauen

German History in Documents and Images – Occupation and the Emergence of Two States (1945-1961): 3. Reconstituting German Society (German Historical Institute)

Experienced: 11.01.2009 || Recounted: 26.04.2015 Click here for bigger map
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